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The Internet has many places to ask questions about anything imaginable and find past answers on almost everything.

Is won in a sentence?

Is won in a sentence?

He had won the election. They won the game easily. He won the first prize in the competition. She won first prize in the exhibition.

Is alright a complete sentence?

All rightand alright are a pair of words that may sometimes be confused because one is the complete spelling of the phrase while the other is a one-word version of the former. Meanwhile, the term alright is considered a one-word spelling of all right and is used the same way. …

Is eat a complete sentence?

For example: “It eats it.” This is a complete sentence because it contains a subject, verb, and expresses a complete thought. Usually a subject and/or verb will complete the thought.

Is I am happy a complete sentence?

Yes, “I am happy.” is a complete sentence. Sentences that are incomplete are known as “phrases.”

What is the shortest complete sentence?

“Go!” Is The Shortest Grammatically Correct Sentence In English (+29 Fun Facts)

  • According to the Global Language Monitor, the estimated number of words in the English language is 1,025,109.
  • “I am” is the shortest complete sentence in the English language.

What is the longest sentence possible?

The Guinness Book of Records lists the longest proper sentence as one from William Faulkner’s novel ‘Absalom, Absalom!’ (1,287 words). Some ancient languages, such as Sanskrit and Greek, did not have any punctuation. So all their sentences were long!

What is the hardest sentence to read?

Originally Answered: What is the most difficult sentence in the English language? The runners-up are: A 1,288-word sentence from Absalom, Absalom by William Faulkner. A 3,687-word sentence from Ulysses by James Joyce.

What is the longest word in any language?

Floccinaucinihilipilification, at 29 letters and meaning the act of estimating something as being worth so little as to be practically valueless, or the habit of doing so, is the longest non-technical, coined word in Oxford Dictionaries of the English language.